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Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Tuesday - First Chapter - First Paragraph - In Farleigh Field



Each Tuesday, Diane at Bibliophile By the Sea shares the first part of a book that she is reading or thinking about reading.  This week I'm sharing:  In Farleigh Field by Rhys Bowen.  This is a standalone book by an author that continues to win awards year after year for several of her mystery series - the Royal Spyness series, the Molly Murphy series, and the Evan Evans series.  Bowen, who is part of the group of women authors who blog at Jungle Red Writers, shared that this is a book she's been thinking of writing for many years.  When she first proposed it, she had an agent who told her that no one wanted to read about World War II.  Hmmm....see what you think (by the way, I'm skipping over the prologue and sharing a bit of the first chapter):




Bletchley Park
May 1941

     Lady Pamela Sutton stared at the dreary government-issued posters on the wall of her small cubicle in Hut 3.  Some of them cheerful exhortations to do one's best, to soldier on with a stiff upper lip, and others dire warnings about letting the side down.  Beyond the blackout curtains that covered the windows, dawn would be breaking.  She could hear the chorus of birds in the woods behind the hut, still chirping madly and joyfully as they had done before the war began and would keep doing after it ended--whenever that would be.  It had already gone on too long, and there was no end in sight.  Pamela rubbed her eyes.  It had been a long night, and her eyes were stinging with tiredness.  According to civil-service regulations, women were not supposed to work on the night shift with men, in case their morals were compromised.  She had found this amusing when the shortage of male translators meant that one of the girls had to do night-shift work.  'Frankly, I don't think my honour is in danger from any of the chaps here,' she had said.  'They are more interested in maths problems then girls.'
   

Blurb:

World War II comes to Farleigh Place, the ancestral home of Lord Westerham and his five daughters, when a soldier with a failed parachute falls to his death on the estate. After his uniform and possessions raise suspicions, MI5 operative and family friend Ben Cresswell is covertly tasked with determining if the man is a German spy. The assignment also offers Ben the chance to be near Lord Westerham’s middle daughter, Pamela, whom he furtively loves. But Pamela has her own secret: she has taken a job at Bletchley Park, the British code-breaking facility.

As Ben follows a trail of spies and traitors, which may include another member of Pamela’s family, he discovers that some within the realm have an appalling, history-altering agenda. Can he, with Pamela’s help, stop them before England falls?

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This book and synopsis reminds me of the TV series, Foyle's War.  I've been fascinated by anything and everything I hear about Bletchley Park, and I'm also intrigued by reading about the folks at home in Britain during WWII.  I read recently here on Jungle Reds that the people who were stationed at Bletchley Park had to sign an official secrets document that wasn't lifted until the 1990's.  So, many families had no idea of the work their loved ones performed during that time.  Also, noted here was Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, had a grandmother who was a Bletchley Park girl.  I'm looking forward to reading this book!  

32 comments:

  1. This is on my reading list. I like the sound of it and find Bletchley fascinating.

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    1. So many of us want to know more about Bletchley and those code breakers!

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  2. I'm looking forward to reading this book too. Books about Bletchley Park fascinate me.

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    1. I'm right there with you, Margaret!

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  3. Wow. This has a lot going for it. Now I have to see if my library has a copy.

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    1. It's pretty new, so they may not have it yet, but I bet they will. Rhys Bowen is very popular.

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  4. I have been wanting to read this author, and I am also intrigued lately by WWII stories, especially when each one I've read has focused on different countries. With each setting, our perspective of events is altered.

    Thanks for sharing...and for visiting my blog.

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    1. You're right - it's nice to see things through the eyes of others - a different perspective indeed.

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    1. Oh, I bet that book was wonderful, Jenclair! I remember reading a book many years ago that was titled ENIGMA (I think). First time I had heard of Bletchley and the code breakers.

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  6. I only recently discovered that my mother was connected to Bletchley Park during the war - she wasn't based there but at the signalling stations that intercepted the German codes. We knew she worked in Signals but didn't know she was part of the whole code-breaking set-up till after she died, when my aunt, her sister, told us - my mother had apparently told her after the war and sworn her to secrecy...

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    1. Oh wow! That is fascinating! So, I'm supposing your mother had to sign the secrets act and keep her part 'hush-hush'. My father was in the Army in WWII, but he was in the Pacific.

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  7. I've seen this around and am contemplating reading it. The setting and time frame are of great interest to me, as members of my family lived through WWII in England. Hope it's a satisfying read, Kay.

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    1. I can see how that would make it even more interesting, Catherine. I think it will likely be very good.

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  8. Hmm, not sure about this one for me, but, hope that you like it.

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    1. We'll see, Diane. I'm hoping so.

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  9. Author and subject matter very appealing — I'm making a note of it. Thanks for bringing it to our attention. Here's my link for today — http://wp.me/p4DMf0-1v4

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  10. I'm glad to find out about this author. There's a lot going on in the intro, but I'd keep reading! I'm adding this one to my list.

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    1. Monica, this author is quite popular. Think this will be fun!

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  11. I bought this book and another of Rhys Bowen's just last week. I've never read her before but I'm hearing so many good things about her stories. I like this first paragraph so I'm anxious to get going on it. Thanks for the link to her blog. That should be fun.

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    1. Margot, that blog is quite interesting. Several mystery authors and always something fun to talk about.

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  12. I'm fascinated by stories set in WWII. This sounds like a book I'd enjoy reading.
    My Tuesday post features A Thread of Truth.

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    1. I think a lot of us really like WWII stories. :-)

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  13. I've been wanting to read this author for a long time, plus I like stories set in WWII. I'd definitely read this one.

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    1. Yes, she's been on my list for a long time too. This seems a good place to start.

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  14. I just started this and am super excited about it! I worked with a woman whose mother worked at Bletchley Park and was always so fascinated with the concept. Hope you enjoy it!

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    1. Isn't it amazing how many people just in our small blogging circle have some connection to that place?

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  15. Some really good details here. Hope you enjoy it. Here's Mine

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  16. I'm looking forward to reading this one, too. I've had it for awhile, just haven't gotten around to it. *Sigh* So many books, so little time ...

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Thanks for stopping by! I am so happy to hear your thoughts and will respond as soon as I can. Happy Reading!